Definition of Art

The Tower of Babel

The Tower of Babel in Germany is a place of worship for Christians. The Tower of Babel in fact, the tower is said to be the second heaven. The Tower of Babel it is also called thealia or the abode of God. The story in Genesis 11:5 describes the Tower of David as a place where the Lord was seated with the angel Gabriel. This is what most Christian churches believe, even though the reference is not literal and doesn’t really refer to the Second Temple.

According to the Bible, when the Temple of Jerusalem was destroyed by the Romans in 70 A.D., God moved his throne to heaven and placed the Holy Land under a canopy. From that time on, stories about the rebuilding of the world began to be told. The Tower of Babel is one such story, but this has also been used to justify the idea that the Old Testament covers almost everything God does. While the story itself is apocryphal, most scholars also agree that it gives us a vivid picture of what happened in ancient times.

The Bible

The Bible, when the kingdom of Israel was destroyed by the enemy, the people lived in the city for two years without food and water. The Bible when the rebuilding began, they abandoned the city and God gave them the Tabernacle of Israel, which was the tent they rebuilt. The Bible but, the Israelites did not rebuild the Tabernacle in the same place where it had stood before the war. They transferred it to Jerusalem, where the story of the Tabernacle of Israel is told today. In other words, the story of the Tower of Babel is meant to give us a picture of the Old Testament as it was intended.

Another popular version of the story of the babel comes from the Nene’s Hymn to the Virgin Mary. As you can imagine, the nativity story is very detailed, including the timing for the star to rise. Because the story was intended for the spiritual purposes of children, the nativity could not be shown on television or in movies. The only way the story of the babel could be retold is through art. The artists who re-enact the story of the babel would need to have a special talent for visualizing God’s Word as it was meant to be seen.

Artist

Artist who has re-enacted the story of the babel, Yair Manoog, says he has difficulty telling the exact date of the beginning of the universe. Artist a more realistic answer would be B.C. However, he can give a fairly accurate age. Artist in the story of the babel, there is also a great deal of symbolic imagery. The tower is known as the “Babylon” or the “ledge of God.” This is a common symbol in Jewish art. It represents the vastness of the universe and the fact that God is omnipresent. A number of Christians have also adopted this symbolic meaning and often use the Babylon Stone to ward off evil spirits.

The story of the babel is also representative of the triumph of good over evil. In the story, the children who celebrate the coming of Christ are driven from their city by Judas Iscariot, the betrayer of Jesus. They flee into the desert to escape the violence of their city and eventually come to the place where the Babylonia Temple once stood. The stone they roll a large number of goats into a pile, which represents the mass of animals which were slaughtered in the city of Jerusalem. It is symbolic of the number of victims, the Jews had to bear for the sake of their God.

A monument called the Church of the Holy Sepulcher stands at the location where the Old Temple once stood. This is where the rebuilt Temple will be built in the future. It was destroyed in 70 A.D. so this is a time honored tradition. Today, a new generation is starting to build the future temple and this is a spiritual act that is also meant to pay homage to the Lord Jesus Christ.

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